Thursday, January 15, 2015

Gardening in Texas: January

More and more people are asking me questions about gardening because I talk about it a lot and it must seem like I have some answers. Though I cannot proclaim to be an expert and have in fact failed heartily again and again, I thought a post about what you should be doing in your garden in January in Texas might be a good one because I have figured out a few things over the years.

 I keep reading blog posts about what you should be doing in your garden in January, but they are for places that have real winters....they advise you to peruse the seed catalogs, make a plan,  then order your seeds. But in Texas it is time to do some work and not only order your seeds, but start them. 

I generally do things kind of willy-nilly and since that hasn't been super successful in the past this year I decided to make a plan and "get it together" maybe you can benefit from my plan too.

The first thing I did was assess the leftover seeds from last year and remind myself to REST when the weather is cold. The thing about January in Texas is that it might be cold one day and 60 degrees the next, you have to rest when you can because winter is pretty short...or at least it occurs in short bursts. You have to pay attention and plan ahead. We "make hay while the sun shines" meaning if the day is warm we drop everything and we work outside. This coming weekend is looking like a lovely one and there is lots of work to be done.

The seed box with old seeds and my little seasonal book.
After assessing my leftovers, I ordered all my seeds January 2nd. This year I used Territorial Seed Company for two reasons: they offer organic seed (so we can avoid bee-killing neonicotinoids) and they are 100% Non-GMO. This is important to us and I'm not going to step up on my soapbox (today) about industrial food and why we should avoid GMO, but you should educate yourself. I ordered my onions and leeks from Territorial Seed Company too, but I always get my potato seed from Wood Prairie Farm.

Three bin composting.
The other big job in January is prepping the beds (esp. the potato bed), spreading the finished compost, and building new compost piles. As soon as things green up, I will put my composting in high gear, bagging green grass clippings to mix  with the "brown" parts (ie. poop and hay) to really get the pile steaming hot. For now, I just concentrate on putting leaves, dead plants, etc. in the bin. I try to tidy up during this time...For example, I still have dead okra stalks in the garden and just a week ago cut down the dead asparagus tops.The goal is to have one finished bin in the winter and have one ready to layer with greenies in the Spring. 

Finished compost will go on the asparagus bed and potato beds first and then to other beds that were less than productive last year. I never have enough for every bed, but I get pretty close!


Another January task is to nurture along the two cold frames with lettuce, radishes, beets, spinach, and cilantro. These cold frames need very little tending. In fact, I keep them closed and warm most of the time. I try to only open them for watering on sunny days. This weekend we are expecting 60 degrees, so I'll crack the windows to let some heat escape and water them thoroughly.

In January, we also build any new beds we want for Spring planting. We build beds year round, but January is a big push to get new areas prepped for sowing seed and transplanting in March. With the coming warm weekend, I'll also be cleaning out the barn of waste hay and poop. This will be used for hugelkultur beds and for sheet mulching some beds that are around the foundation of the house. Yes, I know what you are thinking, "She's going to spread the poopy barn hay around her house." Yep, poop by the house.... I'm just starting to see the benefits of this practice after a year, but sheet mulching has killed the weeds and grass and is now composting slowly to amend the terrible soil they brought in for the foundation. The best part: I have done NO WORK at all besides dumping the hay/poop mulch. I will be able to plant those spaces this year and all I had to do was dump some mulch and WAIT....seriously, why have I ever done anything else?



Once the seeds arrive I divide them into things that need to be started (in my NEW greenhouse!!!!) and things we will direct sow later. I used a Seed Starting Plan to determine when to start each plant. Here's my plan:

For Texas:
From Jan 2nd to the 16th: Cabbage, Collards, Kale, Parsley, and Peppers
From Jan. 16th to the 30th: Broccoli, Cauliflower, and Eggplant
Jan 30: Tomatoes

I'll be starting seeds in the next few days (yeah, I know I'm already going to be a little late on my schedule) and I'll post pics and progress as we go.

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